I'm a paragraph. Click here to add your own text and edit me. It’s easy. Just click “Edit Text” or double click me to add your own content and make changes to the font. Feel free to drag and drop me anywhere you like on your page. I’m a great place for you to tell a story and let your users know a little more about you.

I'm a paragraph. Click here to add your own text and edit me. It’s easy. Just click “Edit Text” or double click me to add your own content and make changes to the font. Feel free to drag and drop me anywhere you like on your page. I’m a great place for you to tell a story and let your users know a little more about you.

Rana temporaria is known as the common frog and is our only tuly native frog in the UK. Recently a scheme to reintroduce Pool Frogs has been undertaken as these were native to the UK but had died out many years ago. Several species of intruduced European frogs have survived for many years in locations in the South of England as well as an escapee from the pet trade the huge American bullfrog which is causing havoc in ponds as it out competes our native amphibians for food. In most cases it actually eats our native frogs and newts. It also carries chytridiomicosis which is a fungal disease responsible for massive mortality in amphibian populations around the world.

 

Frogs. Rana temporaria

Common frogs are a regular visitor to the Wilderness Tamed garden ponds. They seem to be favouring the oldest and newest of the ponds this season with the middle pond being left out. I think the reason being the oldest pond was recently dredged out and the newest pond is still establishing. The middle pond has a lot of vegetation and is perhaps a bit chocked up for them to use. Having said that frogs are notoriously unfussy about where they breed. Several pairs are already locked together in the mating embrace called amplexus. The males clamping their forelegs round the waists of the larger fatter females. these embraces can last weeks until the female decides the time and conditions are right to release her spawn. The male fertilises the spawn as it is released. Then, job done, the couple separate and the females usually leave the ponds. The males often hanging around all year.

 

 

Frogs are quite easily distinguished from toads. 

  • Frogs hop almost everywhere and as a result have thick long bakc legs.

  • Toads tend to walk everywhere and only hop when alarmed. Hence their back legs are short and thin.

  • Frogs have a dark mask from their nostrils to the back of the ear drum.

  • Frogs have a plainly visibly eardrum behind the eye.

  • Toads have bulges on the tops of their heads called the parotid glands.

  • Frog skin always looks wet and is only slightly nobbly.

  • Toad skin looks dry when they are on land and is noticably warty. 

  • Frogs emerge much earlier than toads from hibernation and they mate and spawn earlier in ponds.

Wilderness Tamed John Grundy